It’s important for children to learn both to respect and appreciate people’s differences as well as to understand all the things they have in common.

• I’m one of a kind! Ask kids to strike a superhero pose and share one special thing about him- or herself. Others can respond, “You are unique!”

• The same and different. Have kids stand side by side with a partner and come up with ways they are the same, and ways they are different. What color hair and eyes do they each have? How many ears? Do they wear glasses? What is their favorite color?

• Talk about families. Invite kids to draw and share a family picture. Say, “Not all families are the same. Some families have one parent, some have two, some may even have more. Sometimes there are brothers or sisters or grandparents.” Then talk about what’s true of all families—for instance, that they all love and take care of each other.

• Dance to differences! Put on music from different countries and cultures. Ask, “How is each song different from the others?” “How are they the same?” (They’ll probably all make you want to dance!)

• Have a whole-world party. If possible, invite friends to share their culture, whether it’s from across the ocean or down the street. They might share a story, bring a snack, or introduce a family tradition. Share yours, too!