Stretching a budget to feed a family or not having enough food for everyone may be overwhelming, but there are places to look for help.

  • The National WIC Association (NWA) is made up of thousands of state and local service provider agencies offering nutritious foods, nutrition and breastfeeding education, and health and social service referrals to WIC mothers and young children. Visit nwica.org.
  • The Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP) is the federal government’s food-stamp program. Visit fns.usda.gov/snap.
  • Feeding America is the nation’s largest domestic hunger-relief organization, with a network of food banks that provide food assistance to those who need it. Visit feedingamerica.org.
  • The Meals on Wheels Association of America’s member programs feed those who are 60 years of age and older and those in need. Visit mowaa.org.
  • In the National School Lunch Program, children in grades K–12 can get free or lower-price lunches at school. Some schools also serve breakfast, after-school snacks, fresh fruits and vegetables, and summer meals. Ask someone at your child’s school office, or visit fns.usda.gov/cnd.

Besides reaching out for help, it’s important for families to talk together about food. Children may feel worried or anxious if food is sometimes limited, but listening and talking openly can reassure children and help families find solutions together. Adults should remember this is a tough subject, so it’s okay not to have all the answers.